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Home life

Hunter syndrome affects many different parts of life, and as a result you will need to make significant adjustments to your routine and your environment. This section outlines the potential impact on everyday life, and some tips on how to manage these at home.

As described in the Signs and symptoms of Hunter syndrome page, Hunter syndrome may be classified as non-neuronopathic (the disease affects the body but not the nerves and brain) or neuronopathic (the disease affects the body and the nerves and brain). The different sets of symptoms will require different changes to be made to your lifestyle and home environment.

Non-Neuronopathic
Neuronopathic
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Symptoms such as problems with mobility and fine motor skills are likely to require adjustments to the home environment so that your child can move around the house more easily, play safely and manage more tasks by themselves.

As the disease develops, children will become progressively more dependent, requiring carers to provide for all their needs.

Click on the house for tips and advice for adaptations to home life.

Click on the apartment below for tips and advice for adaptations to home life.

Children with neuronopathic Hunter syndrome often have challenging behaviour such as tantrums, obstinacy and hyperactivity. This means they need close supervision at all times, and a specially safeguarded environment to prevent injuries and accidents.

As the disease develops, children will become progressively more dependent, requiring carers to provide for all their needs.

Click on the house for tips and advice for adaptations to home life.

Click on the apartment below for tips and advice for adaptations to home life.